The Fabrication Shop Mk.II

Discussion in 'GT Resource Center' started by ttourist, Mar 16, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>The Fabrication Shop</strong>

    <strong>Getting More Out of Gran Turismo With Your Wheel</strong>


    <strong>Ok, you&rsquo;re trying to go fast and the parts you ordered come in and they are good but&hellip;..they could be better. And, you can see <em>how</em> to make them better. Time to take a trip to the Fabrication Shop and <em>make</em> them better. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/happy.gif" width="16px" /> The G25/G27 is a nice piece of equipment but it surely leaves some room for improvement.</strong>&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" />

    <strong>DISCLAIMER:&nbsp; Modifying your G25/G27 may void your warranty. Please take your own abilities and skills into consideration before attempting any modifications and do so at your own risk.</strong>

    ***Ok, guys, is <em><strong>THAT</strong></em> good enough?!*** Sheesh&hellip;.Lawyers&hellip;can&rsquo;t stand &lsquo;em. No, actually, they&rsquo;re not bad&hellip;..if you cook &lsquo;em slow. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/grin.gif" width="16px" />

    So, I get my G25 and driving rig all put back together after making a bunch of changes to them over the last few weeks (and I&rsquo;m diggin&rsquo; it&hellip;I&rsquo;m <em>reeeely</em> diggin&rsquo; it) and my internet is on the fritz. Perfect timing. Oh well, guess I&rsquo;ll start another GT project that will end up being larger than I planned. :) As far as I can tell, we don&rsquo;t really have a thread like this so here goes&hellip;

    This thread is for those who wish to or have already made improvements to their G25s/G27s. It is also an attempt to fuel the desire in those of you who don&rsquo;t have one yet. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /> As well as for educating myself further. :) It is for discussing G25/G27 mods for Gran Turismo. Posts regarding the Logitech Force Feedback Wheels as well as the Fanatec wheels are also welcome.&nbsp; It is not for mods that cannot be used in Gran Turismo. It is not for &ldquo;cheat&rdquo; mods. If you want to talk about those kinds of mods, please do so elsewhere. I will attempt to bring a bunch of mods together with some degree of organization so that those who are interested in improving their GT experience can easily see most of what is available. Please feel free to discuss your experiences with G25/G27 mods, post how-tos, links, pics, ask for and give tips, etc.

    I hope to update this thread regularly (at least for a while) and, it will probably take me a little while to get all the mods posted that I have done (so please bear with me for a bit). I will start with some of the simpler items and get into the more involved mods later. For now, I will focus on the pedal and shifter mods as I have not done much with the wheel. In the meantime, if anyone would like to start sharing wheel mods, please do. Hope to have some good ones to incorporate into the OP.&nbsp; Throughout this thread, I will attempt to use consistent terminology when refering to the various parts involved.&nbsp; The following pics have the parts labelled with the terms I will use.&nbsp; The first two pics are from the Nixim site.&nbsp; I plan to cover the Nixim brake mod in the near future.&nbsp; You can see it here:&nbsp; <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://www.nixim.com/pedmod.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.nixim.com/pedmod.html</a><a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="1" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" width="1" /></a>

    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" width="500" /></a>

    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" width="500" /></a>
    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="1" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" width="1" /></a>

    The whole pedal lever, piston/cylinder, pedal base, all together will be referred to as the "pedal unit" or "pedal assembly."


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture009-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="419" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture009-1.jpg" width="599" /></a>


    More pics to be posted as needed.




    <strong>G25/G27 Pedal Mods</strong>

    <strong>Changing Pedal Height</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20335&viewfull=1#post20335" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20335&viewfull=1#post20335</a>


    <strong>Reducing Noise During Pedal Operation</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Medium</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Partial.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20338&viewfull=1#post20338" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20338&viewfull=1#post20338</a>


    <strong>Inverting the Pedals</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Easy/Medium</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20340&viewfull=1#post20340" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20340&viewfull=1#post20340</a>


    <strong>Increasing the Resistance of the Pedals</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Medium</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20341&viewfull=1#post20341" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20341&viewfull=1#post20341</a>


    <strong>Increasing the Length of the Clutch Pedal Lever</strong>
    Difficulty:&nbsp; Medium
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20342&viewfull=1#post20342" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20342&viewfull=1#post20342</a>



    <strong>G25/G27 Wheel Mods</strong>

    <strong>The White Stripe</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Very Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; No.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331</a>


    <strong>Increasing the Resistance of the Paddle Shifters (G25 only)</strong>
    Difficulty:&nbsp; Medium-Hard
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; No.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20344&viewfull=1#post20344" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20344&viewfull=1#post20344</a>



    <strong>G25/G27 Shifter Mods</strong>

    <strong>Increasing The Resistance While Pushing Shifter Down To Engage Reverse</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20332&viewfull=1#post20332" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20332&viewfull=1#post20332</a>


    <strong>Making the Shifter Quieter</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20339&viewfull=1#post20339" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20339&viewfull=1#post20339</a>







    <strong>Mods for Other Logitech Force Feedback Models</strong>

    <strong>The White Stripe</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Very Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; No.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331</a>






    <strong>Fanatec Mods</strong>

    <strong>The White Stripe</strong>
    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Very Easy</strong>
    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; No.</strong>
    <a class="jive-link-external-small" href="http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331" target="_blank">http://tunerspit.com/forum/showthread.php?992-The-Fabrication-Shop-Mk.II&p=20331&viewfull=1#post20331</a>
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2011
  2. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>The White Stripe</strong>



    <strong>Difficulty: Very Easy</strong>

    <strong>You Will Need: White Acrylic Paint, Paintbrush</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Probably not...unless you can figure out a way to get the paint off of the wheel without damaging it.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /></strong>



    Ok. Here&rsquo;s the first mod. (I told you we were going to start basic) <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /> The familiar &ldquo;White Stripe.&rdquo; Even the one-handed lever-pulling chimp PD uses to chose the online events could do this one. J In five minutes, your wheel could be just a little bit better.

    It&rsquo;s simple: paint a white stripe (about ½" - ¾&rdquo; wide) at the twelve o&rsquo;clock position of your wheel. This helps the driver to quickly and accurately determine wheel position after enthusiastic steering inputs. The first time I did this, I painted a thin line but found that it was not as easy to see out of the corner of my eye. Made the stripe wider and that seemed to help a lot. I used acrylic paint and it has been durable and cleans up well. Using tape may be tempting but, I wouldn&rsquo;t use it due to issues with stickiness, peeling and clean up.

    Through rigorous testing, it has been determined that this mod will also work with wheels other than the G25. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" />



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    If you had trouble with this one, stop immediately.&nbsp; Do not do any of the other mods.&nbsp; :|&nbsp; Seriously.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" />
     
  3. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Increasing The Resistance While Pushing Shifter Down To Engage Reverse</strong>



    <strong>Difficulty: Easy</strong>

    <strong>You will need: Phillips screwdriver, metric Allen wrenches, spring, something to cut the spring to length if needed (I used a Dremel tool with a cutoff disc)</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Completely reversible.</strong>



    One not-so-great thing about the G25 is that it takes very little pressure to push the shift lever down in order to engage reverse. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/sad.gif" width="16px" /> It&rsquo;s not uncommon to grab for sixth gear and find yourself in reverse. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/angry.gif" width="16px" /> Or, you pull back while using sequential and it doesn't spring back to center when you release because it's stuck in the reverse position.&nbsp; Plus, the lack of resistance just makes it feel cheesy and cheap and plastic. There are some pretty complicated fixes for this out there but I came up with something that is simple and works great.

    First, remove the gray shifter cap with the h-pattern diagram on it. It pops of easily. I just used my fingernails.

    Then, with a Phillips screwdriver, remove the screw in the shifter knob underneath the cap you just took off. Pull up on the knob and the knob will come off.

    Around the shifter boot, there is a ring of small Allen head screws. Remove them. Pull up on the shifter boot and the boot will come off. Disassembly is complete. Piece of cake.

    We are going to be installing a spring on the shift lever (the metal shaft that the knob and boot were removed from). A hardware store with a good selection of springs is a valuable asset for at least a few mods I am going to be posting. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /> You will need to find a spring of sufficient length that fits over the shift lever. I found one that fit with very little &ldquo;slop&rdquo; and it works well. See what you can find and use one whose firmness feels about right. I went fairly firm with mine (approaching the force required in a real car with a light shifter feel). It seems that a spring made from light gauge (thin) wire with a good deal of space between coils would be ideal because it allows easy changing from h-pattern mode to sequential mode.&nbsp; Keep in mind we are dealing with plastic components so I wouldn&rsquo;t go nuts with a really strong spring.

    Ok. You got a spring. One more hurdle. It must be cut to length (unless you got lucky and found the right length). I cut the spring to a length such that, when everything was installed, the spring was loaded (slightly compressed). Remember to have the boot and knob in place while determining what spring length you will need (the collar in the top of the boot and the knob take up some space). Cut the spring to length (keeping in mind that a little too long is better than a little too short - you can always shorten the spring a bit after test fitting). Once you get the right length, install the spring onto the shift lever and reassemble everything.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture015.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture015.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    No more annoying accidental reverse. J And it has a much more solid, firm, real feel to it. A two dollar spring and maybe half an hour to do it all. Easy to do and makes your G25 just a little bit better.
     
  4. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Changing Pedal Height</strong>



    <strong>Difficulty: Easy</strong>

    <strong>You will need: Metric Allen wrenches or equivalent, screws, spacers, (more tools may be needed)</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Completely reversible.</strong>



    Ok. Last one for now in the &ldquo;So Easy a Caveman Can Do It&rdquo; series. This mod changes the position of the brake and clutch pedals to more closely emulate a real car and allow for easier heel-toe. It brings the brake and clutch pedals closer to the driver while the gas pedal stays in its original position. Simple, really - you just add some spacers between the pedal lever and the existing pedal spacers.

    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="201" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" width="269" /></a>

    First, remove the two Allen screws from the brake or clutch pedal. What comes off is the pedal plate (the stainless steel piece) and the factory pedal spacer (the black plastic piece). Now you can see what you are dealing with. You have a nice flat surface on the pedal lever for your spacers to rest on. The other surface your spacers will rest on (the factory pedal spacer) is less flat. It has that rectangular piece in the center (which normally would fit into the hole in the pedal lever). Keep that in mind as you look for spacers because you may have to make a little notch in your spacer to accommodate the factory pedal spacer.

    Time for another trip to the hardware store. Take one of the screws you removed from the pedal with you to make sure you get the right ones. Decided that while I was at it, might as well upgrade to stainless steel hardware, too. If you are upgrading the gas pedal hardware you will need two screws just like the one you brought into the store but in stainless. To accommodate your new spacers on the other pedals, you will need four longer screws. If I recall correctly, a 50mm screw is plenty if you are raising your pedals ¾&rdquo;. If you were to go an inch (and I could see doing that), you may want something a bit longer. I would recommend either getting long screws and cutting them to length later or bringing your pedal and factory spacer with you and putting it all together with your new spacer to determine screw length. When cutting screws to length keep in mind that the factory spacer is angled so the required screw length for the two holes in each pedal is slightly different.

    <strong>***CAUTION*** Installing a screw too far into the pedal assembly could result in damage. The piston/cylinder assembly (big red PLASTIC thing) is behind the pedal lever so don&rsquo;t drive a screw into it.</strong> <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" />

    There are probably a million ways to do these spacers. Here&rsquo;s what I came up with. Looked around at the local hardware store and found some 3/8&rdquo; thick by 1&rdquo; diameter round white nylon spacers with holes in the center. Stack two of them and it&rsquo;s a ¾&rdquo; spacer which was about what I was looking for. The center holes were much larger than the screws to be used but, in the same bin at the hardware store were some smaller spacers which fit snugly in the center hole of the larger spacer. Sweet! The screw fit through the center but there was some play there so went a couple aisles over and found a piece of brass tubing that would just fit over the screw and just fit inside the spacer. J I love my hardware store......&nbsp; I doubt that it is at all necessary for your spacer to fit as tightly as mine did but I liked it. It couldn&rsquo;t hurt the strength or stability of the assembly.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture006.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture006.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    With all necessary parts in hand, time to do the install. The nylon spacers meant it was very easy to cut a small notch for the rectangular protrusion on the factory spacer. Once the spacers were fitted, just had to cut the screws to length. If you can, I would recommend installing the screws and then cutting them to length (if needed) while they are installed. That way, as they are being unscrewed, their threads will be cleaned up a bit from the cutting - if you cut first and then install, you are more likely to cross-thread. Now you&rsquo;re home free. Just put it all back together and enjoy a G25 that is just a little bit better. J

    Welllll&hellip;..that ended up being the long-winded version so, here it is in a nutshell:

    <strong>***CAUTION*** Installing a screw too far into the pedal assembly could result in damage. The piston/cylinder assembly (big red PLASTIC thing) is behind the pedal lever so don&rsquo;t drive a screw into it. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /></strong>

    Get yourself some longer pedal screws. Get yourself some spacers (I would recommend ¾&ldquo; - 1&ldquo;). You may have to make little notches in the new spacers to accommodate the factory pedal spacers. Install the new spacers between the pedal lever and the factory pedal spacer and you have an easy improvement to your G25. I know some have even gone so far as to just install a bunch of washers stacked up to serve as a spacer. Seems like that might be a bit unstable but you get the idea - be creative, the spacers can be (or be made from) just about anything.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/happy.gif" width="16px" />
     
  5. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Reducing Noise During Pedal Operation</strong>




    <strong>Difficulty:</strong>&nbsp; <strong>Medium</strong>

    <strong>You Will Need: Metric Allen wrenches or equivalent, Phillips screwdrivers, metric wrenches or equivalent, 1&rdquo; x 12&rdquo; piece of adhesive-backed rubberized non-skid tape or equivalent (you could get by with less), appropriate tool for precise sanding/grinding :eek: (I used a Dremel tool), Xacto knife or equivalent</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; To a degree - not completely.&nbsp; The tape can be removed but the sanding/grinding can't be undone.</strong>



    One of the issues that hurts the immersion factor with the G25, IMO is all the plastic-sounding noises it makes. The pedals make a cheesy, plastic-on-plastic-sounding, &ldquo;clack,&rdquo; noise especially upon quick full pedal application and release. Using the clutch made this particularly noticeable as every time a shift was made, there was a loud &ldquo;clack-clack&rdquo; noise as the pedal was quickly applied and released. Couldn&rsquo;t find an established mod to correct this so, I had to wing it. Upon inspection, it was apparent that the pedal lever was &ldquo;bottoming out&rdquo; on the pedal base during both application and release. Turns out, this is metal on metal but sounds very plastic. Also, on one of the pedal units, the gear on the pedal lever was bottoming out on the pedal base upon application and the gear on the potentiometer was bottoming out on the pedal base upon release. This is plastic on metal. Performing this mod reduced my pedal noise by 90%.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" width="500" /></a>


    First, remove all three pedal plates and pedal spacers. See Figure 1. There are two Allen head screws in each. Now, the pedal housing can be opened. On the underside of the pedal housing, there are 14 small Phillips head screws (two of them are kinda hidden behind the carpet gripper). See Figure 2. Once these are removed, the pedal housing comes apart. <strong>***CAUTION*** Be careful while you are opening the housing as there is very little &ldquo;slack&rdquo; in the wiring. I ended up detaching the wiring so it wasn&rsquo;t attached to both halves of the pedal housing.</strong>
    <strong> </strong>
    <strong> </strong><strong><a href="http://boardsus.playstation.com/t5/forums/editpage/board-id/granturismo/message-id/"><img border="0" height="1" src="http://boardsus.playstation.com/t5/forums/editpage/board-id/granturismo/message-id/" width="200" /></a></strong>
    <strong><a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" width="500" /></a></strong>
    <strong> </strong>
    <strong> </strong>
    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-2.gif" width="500" /></a>


    Once the pedal housing has been opened, you can see all the goodies inside. See Figure 5. I did one pedal at a time so I could look at the other, still assembled, pedal units as a guide for reassembly. <strong>***CAUTION*** From here on out, you will be dealing with some fairly fragile components so, be careful and gentle.</strong> At either end of the pedal unit, there is a long Allen bolt. One at the end of the pedal lever, one at the end of the piston. Remove the bolt at the end of the piston (the piston is spring loaded so it will want to come out of the cylinder when the bolt is removed). Remove the piston and spring from the cylinder and set aside. Remove the Allen bolt from the end of the pedal lever and set aside (the gear on the pedal lever is meshed with the gear on the potentiometer so be careful). Disassembly is complete.

    Take a look at the area inside the pedal base. You will most likely see discolored, worn areas where components have been making contact with the pedal base. The components making contact is the source of the majority of the noise. To start with, we will be installing pieces of the rubber non-skid tape onto the areas where the pedal lever has been making contact with the pedal base. This acts as an impact absorber and sound deadener. A side effect of this is slightly reduced pedal travel. You may have to compensate for that later, if necessary.

    We will start with the areas that the pedal lever hits when released. Cut three pieces of the non-skid tape 1 3/8&rdquo; x ½&rdquo;. One for each pedal unit. These will be used to cover the areas where the pedal lever was contacting the pedal base. At 1 3/8&rdquo;, they should fit nicely into the pedal base with a little clearance. There are three bolt holes at the pedal lever end of the pedal base. See pic and illustration below - the pedal base as viewed from above - the black dots are the bolt holes and the red rectangle shows placement of the tape. Install the tape next to the two smaller bolt holes while keeping it on the flat part of the pedal base. Now, when the pedal is released, it will contact the tape (metal on rubber) instead of contacting the pedal base (metal on metal). No more &ldquo;clack&rdquo; noise when the pedal is released. J


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-1-1.gif" width="500" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture010.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture010.jpg" width="600" /></a>




    Now, to take care of the noise when the pedal is fully engaged. Similar to what we just did but I preferred to only install the tape where one side of the pedal lever makes contact with the pedal base. Did not add any on the gear side. Cut three pieces of the tape to ½&rdquo; x ½&rdquo;. Find the area where the pedal lever was making contact with the pedal base (on the side opposite the pedal lever gear). See illustration below - the gray area represents the Allen bolt. The small red area shows tape placement for this step (I aligned mine such that it was near the side of the pedal base and overlaps the oval hole in the pedal base slightly). No more &ldquo;clack&rdquo; noise when the pedal is fully engaged. J


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-1-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="398" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1-1-1-1.gif" width="500" /></a>


    Installing the tape has slightly reduced your pedal travel. It may or may not be an issue. Reinstall the pedal lever (taking care to be gentle while meshing the gears back together and ensuring the gears are indexed properly - use the other pedal assemblies as a guide) and the piston/cylinder assembly to the pedal base. Check to ensure most, if not all, of the noise is gone. If you still have some noise, it is possible that the gear on the pedal lever and/or the gear on the potentiometer is/are making contact with the pedal base. See pic below.&nbsp; The arrow points to the area of the potentiometer gear you may need to modify.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture009-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="419" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture009-1.jpg" width="599" /></a>



    I ended up sanding a little off of the bottom of the gears where they were hitting the pedal base on one of my pedal units but, I would recommend waiting to deal with this issue until after confirming adequate pedal travel. Time for some pedal travel testing. Fire up GT and check to ensure that when you push the pedal all the way down, you see the appropriate response from the GT HUD. Also check for the appropriate response when releasing the pedal. Does yours go all the way from 0 - 100 percent? If it does, great, you're done with that one! Not all of mine did. I ended up using a Dremel tool with a sanding drum to sand down the part of the pedal lever which was contacting the non-skid tape. If you do this, take your time, be patient. Take just a little off of the pedal lever and retest. It&rsquo;s easy (if a bit time consuming) to go back and take a bit more off of the pedal lever but if you take too much off, that may be a different story. It may also be necessary to take a little bit off of the potentiometer gear arm where it contacts the pedal base (I had this issue with my gas pedal) which will allow more potentiometer rotation as the pedal is released.&nbsp; I had mine apart and back together several times. Be aware that the gas pedal position display can do strange things if your car is off of the racing surface during testing.&nbsp; Note: In GT5P, there is no display, that I am aware of, to look at to judge clutch pedal position but I don&lsquo;t believe it will cause a problem - the clutch seems to be completely disengaged well before 100% pedal travel and seems to be completely engaged before pedal is 100% released.

    Got rid of the noise and have full pedal travel? Your done with that pedal unit. Repeat the process with the other two pedal units. Carefully reassemble everything (be nice to those wires) and you&rsquo;re done. When I was finished, the noise was almost completely gone. The exception to this is a quieter plastic-sounding noise from the gas pedal when quickly going full-throttle. Seems to be &ldquo;piston slap&rdquo; - excessive clearance between cylinder and piston which allows the piston to wobble inside the cylinder and slap against the cylinder wall. I have yet to come up with a solution for this - a project for another day. It&rsquo;s still waaaaaay quieter than it was.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/happy.gif" width="16px" />

    Took some time but almost no money and now you have a G25 that is just a little bit better. J
     
  6. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Making the Shifter Quieter</strong>



    <strong>Difficulty: Easy</strong>

    <strong>You Will Need: Phillips screwdriver, metric Allen wrenches, adhesive-backed Velcro (the fuzzy side of the Velcro)(very sticky adhesive and thick Velcro would be ideal), Xacto knife</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Completely reversible.</strong>



    Here&rsquo;s another one from the &ldquo;So Easy a Caveman Can Do It&rdquo; series.

    It&rsquo;s nice to have the h-pattern shifter module that comes with the G25 and it can be a lot of fun but, it&lsquo;s not without its faults. One of the drawbacks with the h-pattern shifter module is the cheesy plastic noise which was heard whenever I shifted gears. The noise is the result of the shift lever (metal rod) smacking against the shifter housing (plastic). This mod eliminates that noise by installing cushioning onto the shifter housing in the contact area. Note: This mod does not affect the metallic clicking noise that many of the G25 shifters make. That is a separate issue.

    First, remove the gray shifter cap with the h-pattern diagram on it. It pops off easily. I just used my fingernails.

    Then, with a Phillips screwdriver, remove the screw in the shifter knob underneath the cap you just took off. Pull up on the knob and the knob will come off.

    Around the shifter boot, there is a ring of small Allen head screws. Remove them. Pull up on the shifter boot and the boot will come off. Disassembly is complete. Piece of cake.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PantsCatthewayiplay-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="500" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PantsCatthewayiplay-1.jpg" width="500" /></a>
    pic from PantsCat at thewayiplay




    Put your shifter into h-pattern mode if it&rsquo;s not already. If you &ldquo;run it through the gears&rdquo; while looking closely, you will see where the shift lever (the metal rod) contacts the shifter housing (the yellow highlighted areas in the above pic). This is where the noise comes from. We will be installing Velcro (the fuzzy side) over the contact areas. Basically, around the entire inside perimeter of the rectangular hole.

    I ended up using an Xacto knife to cut shapes out of the Velcro in order to cover the contact areas completely while leaving a bit of room on the ends to ensure everything would fit and adhere well. The forward and rearward contact areas are rectangular and therefore the easiest to cut. I would start with these. You should be able to get in there with a tape measure and a flashlight and get a fairly accurate measurement (approx. 3/8&ldquo; x 7/8&ldquo;). Once you have cut the forward and rearward pieces and have test fit them, cut out the pieces for the sides.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture016.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture016.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    Hold everything in place where you are going to install it and if the test fit looks good, install the Velcro pieces. Now, your shift lever bumps against nice, soft, cushy Velcro instead of smacking against hard, thin plastic. Run it through the gears again and notice the difference - night and day! Put everything back together and you&rsquo;re done. Costs next to nothing, takes very little time, it&rsquo;s not difficult and, it makes your G25 just a little bit better.
     
  7. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Inverting The Pedals (I &amp; II)</strong>





    <strong>Difficulty:</strong> <strong>Method I - Easy/Medium</strong>
    &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <strong>Method II - Easy/Medium</strong>


    <strong>You will need: Metric Allen wrenches, small and medium Phillips screwdrivers, bolts, washers, something to mount your pedals to</strong>
    <strong> </strong>
    <strong> </strong>
    <strong>Reversibility: Yes. Completely Reversible.</strong>





    Here&rsquo;s another one of the not-so-difficult mods. The G25 comes with a fairly nice pedal module but, there are ways to make it more realistic. In a real car, the pedal levers &ldquo;hang down&rdquo; from above, pivoting at the upper end of the pedal lever. With the G25 pedal module in factory configuration, the pedal levers &ldquo;come up&rdquo; from below, pivoting at the lower end of the pedal lever. This causes the pedals to move in an arc which is different from a real car and, to some people, feels unnatural. I noticed that, unlike in a rear car, my feet almost had to be able to slide across the pedal plates when I used the pedals in the factory configuration. This mod is for making the pedals so that they hang down from above like a real car. I will discuss two methods. With Method I, the pedal units will still be contained in the pedal housing and the gas and brake will be moved slightly closer to each other (which allows for easier heel-toe) while the clutch and brake will be moved slightly further apart. With Method II, the pedal units will be removed from the pedal housing and remounted as you see fit. With both methods, the goal is to invert the pedals and end up with a pedal lever angle near that of a real car.

    Method I: If you take your pedal module and flip it over and then play with the angle a bit, it is easy to approximate the pedal lever angle of a real car. Mount it to your driving rig at the appropriate angle and you have more realistic-feeling pedals. The pedal module has six prethreaded mounting holes in the bottom already so, mounting it to a piece of plywood, sheet metal, etc is very easy. You just have to come up with a way to mount it to your rig. There is one other thing required for this mod. After flipping the pedal module over, the clutch is now on the right and the gas is on the left so, they will need to be swapped. First, remove all three pedal plates and pedal spacers. There are two Allen head screws in each.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture006.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture006.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    Now, the pedal housing can be opened. On the underside of the pedal housing, there are 14 small Phillips head screws. Once these are removed, the pedal housing comes apart. <strong>***CAUTION*** Be careful as you are opening the housing as there is very little &ldquo;slack&rdquo; in the wiring.</strong> I ended up detaching the wiring so it wasn&rsquo;t attached to both halves of the pedal housing.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="500" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" width="600" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-3-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="485" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-3-1-1.gif" width="600" /></a>




    Notice that (hopefully) each pedal unit is labeled &ldquo;A,&ldquo; &ldquo;B,&ldquo; or &ldquo;C.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp; I have circled this in yellow in Figure 3.&nbsp; Mine were labeled and I have seen that at least some others&rsquo; are labeled as well. If yours are not labeled I would recommend labeling them before going any further. A=Accelerator, B=Brake, C=Clutch. You will be dealing with some fairly delicate wiring, etc so use caution in these next steps. Each pedal unit is held to the black plastic pedal housing by four screws (two at each end of the pedal base). Remove the screws from the clutch pedal unit and the gas pedal unit. Put the gas pedal unit where the clutch pedal unit was and vice versa. Mount the pedal units to the pedal housing. Reassemble the two halves of the pedal housing. Reinstall the pedal spacers and pedal plates (they should be turned 180 degrees from their original position). A serendipitous side effect to swapping the clutch pedal unit and the gas pedal unit is that it moves the pedals to a position which lends itself more to heel-toe. Mount the pedal module to your rig in the inverted position and you have a G25 that is a little bit better. J

    Method II: I didn&rsquo;t have enough room to use Method I with my rig. So, I had to remove the pedal units and mount them with no housing. A nice side effect is that it made it easier to do future work on the pedal units as the housing was no longer &ldquo;in the way.&rdquo; A downside to this is that your pedal units become somewhat vulnerable to getting bumped, etc and they are more exposed to dust, dirt, etc.&nbsp; First, remove all three pedal plates and pedal spacers. There are two Allen head screws in each. Now, the pedal housing can be opened.

    On the underside of the pedal housing, there are 14 small Phillips head screws. Once these are removed, the pedal housing comes apart. <strong>***CAUTION*** Be careful while you are opening the housing as there is very little &ldquo;slack&rdquo; in the wiring.</strong> Detach the wiring from the top piece of the pedal housing so it isn&rsquo;t attached to both halves of the pedal housing while you&lsquo;re working on it. You will be dealing with some fairly delicate wires, etc so use caution in these next steps. Notice that (hopefully) each pedal unit is labeled &ldquo;A,&ldquo; &ldquo;B,&ldquo; or &ldquo;C.&rdquo; See above pic (circled in yellow).&nbsp; Mine were labeled and I have seen that at least some others&rsquo; are labeled as well. If yours are not labeled I would recommend labeling them before going any further. A=Accelerator, B=Brake, C=Clutch. Each pedal unit is held to the black plastic pedal housing by four screws (two at each end of the pedal base). Remove the screws. You now have three individual pedal units which are no longer mounted to the housing. I used the pedal housing (in the position noted in Method I) as a template and marked all my mounting holes, thus moving the gas and brake closer together for easier heel-toe and moving the clutch and brake further apart but, the pedal units can be mounted however you want them. Mount the pedal units to your driving rig in the desired position, reinstall the pedal spacers and pedal plates, tidy up the wires and you have a G25 that is a little bit better. J



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture011.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture011.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    Ok, I described the easy part. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /> But, since each driving rig is a bit different, I can&rsquo;t really say what will work well as a pedal mount for you. If you have difficulty coming up with something satisfactory, post some pics of your rig and I&rsquo;ll see what I can do.
     
  8. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Increasing the Resistance of the Pedals</strong>




    <strong>Difficulty:&nbsp; Medium</strong>


    <strong>You will need:&nbsp; Small Phillips screwdriver, metric wrenches, metric Allen wrenches, springs, possibly more - see below</strong>


    <strong>Reversibility: Yes. Complete reversibility.</strong>




    While the G25 pedal resistance is a marked improvement over the DFP/DFGT, it still leaves room for improvement. The resistance is created by a spring inside the pedal cylinder. Replace the spring with a stronger spring of the appropriate size and you have stiffer pedals.

    I started off by putting the brake spring into the clutch pedal unit, buying a stronger spring, cutting it to length, and installing it in the brake pedal unit. Left the gas spring as it was. This provided a good deal of improvement and that is how it stayed until recently. This past weekend, did some more mods and, while everything was all torn apart, I increased the resistance further by installing stronger springs in the brake and the clutch (the clutch mainly because I also lengthened the clutch pedal lever and wanted to counteract the additional leverage - if you chose to lengthen the clutch pedal lever, I would recommend using the same spring in the clutch that you use in the brake as the added leverage will make the clutch pedal seem "lighter" than the brake pedal). The spring I used for the brake was apparently a bit much as it collapsed within a couple minutes. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/grin.gif" width="16px" /> So, I stepped down a notch, still using a VERY firm spring and I now have a brake pedal that is sooooo firm, it feels much like a real car to me. So firm that I realized that some sort of footwear will be necessary as my foot got sore quickly. <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/wink.gif" width="16px" /> Had been considering checking out a load cell brake but no longer seems necessary (don't know if it's even possible in GT). J Still plan to increase the gas pedal resistance very slightly so, hopefully I will have good &ldquo;touch&rdquo; while wearing shoes. Tried the clutch spring in the gas pedal unit and even that was too stiff for my taste.


    First, remove all three pedal plates and pedal spacers. There are two Allen head screws in each. Now, the pedal housing can be opened. On the underside of the pedal housing, there 14 small Phillips head screws. Once these are removed, the pedal housing comes apart. <strong>***CAUTION*** Be careful as you are opening the housing as there is very little &ldquo;slack&rdquo; in the wiring.</strong> I ended up detaching the wiring so it wasn&rsquo;t attached to both halves of the pedal housing.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-2-1.gif" width="600" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Fig-1-1.gif" width="600" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1.gif" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/PedalSpringPicNixim-1.gif" width="600" /></a>


    Once the pedal housing has been opened, you can see all the goodies inside. <strong>***CAUTION*** From here on out, you will be dealing with some fairly fragile components so, be gentle and exercise caution.</strong> At either end of the pedal unit, there is a long Allen bolt. One at the end of the pedal lever, one at the end of the piston. Remove the bolt at the end of the piston (the piston is spring loaded so it will want to come out of the cylinder when the bolt is removed). Remove the piston and spring from the cylinder.&nbsp; In the pic below from left to right: 1) factory clutch spring 2) factory brake spring 3) the first spring I used to mod the brake 4) my current brake spring (and the clutch spring I used after lengthening the clutch pedal lever) (.125 wire gauge, 15/16" outside diameter) 5) the spring that collapsed when used as brake spring.&nbsp; (not pictured is the spring I used for the accelerator - .062 wire gauge, 13/16" outside diameter - greater outside diameter would have been better, 3.5" length)


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture027.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture027.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Take the springs you wish to change to your local hardware store (or whoever has a good selection of springs). Find springs of the appropriate outside diameter and firmness (length doesn&rsquo;t matter much as they can be cut to size later). I went considerably firmer on the clutch spring and waaaay firmer on the brake spring. If there are multiple options available which you think may be suitable, I would just buy them all (since they tend to cost about $2 to $4) and experiment. If you choose to go firmer with the gas pedal, I would recommend only going very slightly firmer.


    Ok, got your springs picked out. Using the clutch or brake spring as a guide, cut the springs to the same length. When you install the springs, they should be very slightly compressed.&nbsp; Stronger springs (made from thicker wire) may create clearance issues with the cylinder and/or with the piston. Inside the cylinder and the piston, there is a three-sided tab which keeps the spring centered.&nbsp; See pic below.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture031.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="600" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture031.jpg" width="420" /></a>


    Your new spring must fit between the tabs and walls of the cylinder and piston. My springs were made of wire that was too thick to fit properly. Some grinding on the inside of both ends of each spring with a grinding drum on a Dremel tool increased the inside diameter enough for them to fit properly. See pic below. Area that was ground down (inside the spring)is most evident on the right side of the pic.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture032.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture032.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    After you have ensured that the springs can be installed without interference from the three-sided tabs, put the pedal units back together. You may wish to test them out before putting everything back into the pedal housing. That way, you won&rsquo;t have to tear everything back apart to change springs. If you choose to do this, make sure that you fully depress each pedal several times before reassembly. As I mentioned earlier, one of my springs collapsed (glad I bought a few different springs while at the hardware store). Cutting the springs too long may make this issue more likely (the springs should only be very slightly compressed when installed). If you are using your hands to test the pedal resistances, keep in mind that your legs are much stronger than your arms and the pedal resistance will not feel as strong while pushing on it with your foot.&nbsp; The gas pedal should feel fairly light, the clutch pedal should feel fairly firm and, the brake pedal should feel very firm.&nbsp; After testing for a few days, I started to experience some binding between the stiffer springs and the interior surface of the cylinders, which caused the pedals to not operate as smoothly as they had before.&nbsp; I found it helpful to apply a thin layer lube to the inside of the pedal cylinders and to the exterior surface of the springs. I used a very small amount of dielectric grease.

    When you are happy with your pedal resistance, put everything back together and go do some racin&rsquo; with your G25 that is just a little bit better.
     
  9. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Increasing the Length of the Clutch Pedal Lever</strong>


    <strong>Difficulty: Medium</strong><br /><br /><strong>You will need:&nbsp; Metric Allen wrenches, metric screws, other items needed depending on your situation.</strong><br /><br />Reversibility:&nbsp; Yes.&nbsp; Complete Reversibility.


    <br />One aspect of the G25 which is less than realistic is the fact that all three pedal levers are the same length.&nbsp; As you depress the pedals, they all have the same distance traveled (throw).&nbsp; In a real car, the clutch pedal has significantly more throw than the other pedals.&nbsp; This mod increases the throw of the clutch pedal by lengthening the clutch pedal lever (to give more throw) and repositioning the clutch pedal unit (to provide the proper pedal plate position).&nbsp; The pedal units have to be removed from the pedal housing and remounted without using the pedal housing.&nbsp; See the &ldquo;Inverting the Pedals&rdquo; mod for more info on this.&nbsp; The following description will be fairly limited as the precise process you use will be determined by your particular setup. <br /><br />In my case, I built a wedge to mount the pedals to when I inverted the pedals.&nbsp; I then cut out the section of the wedge which the clutch pedal was mounted to and made a smaller wedge for the clutch pedal to accommodate the longer clutch pedal lever.&nbsp; Due to space concerns and to compensate for the 1&rdquo; box aluminum that was used for the lever extension, the mounting position for the clutch pedal base was offset by 1&rdquo;.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture020.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture020.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture023.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture023.jpg" width="600" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture024.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="600" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture024.jpg" width="420" /></a>



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture025.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture025.jpg" width="600" /></a>

    The key to finding the proper mounting position for the clutch pedal base is to move in a direction inline with the existing pedal levers.&nbsp; 2.5" in this case.&nbsp; Then compensate (if necessary) for the thickness of whatever you are using for your lever extension (compensate in a direction perpendicular to the pedal base angle).&nbsp; Ensure that your clutch pedal base will be mounted at the same angle as the other pedal bases.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture021.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture021.jpg" width="600" /></a>

    Due to the limitations of my setup, the maximum amount of&nbsp; clutch pedal extension I could obtain was about 2.5&rdquo;.&nbsp; :(&nbsp; If I had more room, I would have liked to go about 3.5&rdquo; to 4&rdquo;.&nbsp; Here's a pic of bigREK's rig which has a clutch pedal lever extension which is significantly longer.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/REKsRig.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/REKsRig.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    After the pedal unit is mounted, cut your lever extension to the proper length, install the lever extension, pedal plate spacer, and pedal plate and check to ensure that your clutch pedal plate is in the proper position.<br /><br />A side effect of lengthening the lever is that it will make the clutch pedal resistance feel lighter.&nbsp; A stronger spring inside the clutch pedal cylinder can counteract this.&nbsp; (see Increasing Pedal Resistance mod for more info)<br /><br />After you have everything put back together and are happy with it, take her for a test drive and enjoy your G25 that is a little bit better.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/happy.gif" width="16px" />
     
  10. ttourist

    ttourist Licensed Racer

    <strong>Increasing the Resistance of&nbsp; the Paddle Shifters (G25 only)</strong>


    <strong>Difficulty:&nbsp; Medium-hard</strong>

    <strong>You will need:&nbsp; Metric Allen wrenches, Phillips head screwdrivers, drill/bits, needle-nosed pliers, plastic repair epoxy, masking tape, tool for packing epoxy into small cavities</strong>

    <strong>Reversibility:&nbsp; No.&nbsp; Not Reversible.&nbsp; Requires modification of the Steering Wheel Collar.</strong>



    The paddle shifters on the G25 are pretty good but, one way they lack realism is that they take very little force to change gears, unlike real cars.&nbsp; Occasionally, especially during aggressive steering inputs, I bump the paddle shifters with my hands.&nbsp; Often, this causes unwanted gear changes, even if the paddles are bumped very lightly.&nbsp; This mod increases the resistance of the paddle shifters to add realism and to prevent unwanted gear changes.

    While the procedure is not particularly difficult, great care should be taken while disconnecting the wheel button wires and while modifying the steering wheel collar, hence the medium-hard difficulty rating.

    First, remove the six Allen head bolts in the center of the steering wheel.&nbsp; An assistant supporting the wheel until it is fully disconnected makes it easier to be gentle with the wheel button wires but is not necessary.&nbsp; While removing the last bolt, ensure that the wheel is properly supported and continue to support it until the steering wheel button wires are disconnected.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture027-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture027-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Remove the steering wheel center cap (it should come off using your fingers) and set aside.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture025-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture025-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Carefully disconnect the steering wheel button wires from the control board.&nbsp; I used needle-nosed pliers for this.&nbsp; Note that I marked the connectors on the right with a red Sharpie to ensure everything gets reconnected properly.&nbsp; Set the steering wheel aside.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture024-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture024-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Remove the small Phillips head screw in the center of the control board.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture023-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture023-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Carefully pull the control board back enough to gain access to the connector on the back side of the board.&nbsp; Carefully disconnect the connector and set aside the control board.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture022.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture022.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Remove the three Steering Wheel Collar retaining screws.&nbsp; The steering wheel collar can now be removed by pulling it towards you while carefully feeding the wire through the center hole.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture021-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture021-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Remove the four paddle shifter retaining screws and remove the paddle shifters from the collar.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture019-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture019-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture018-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture018-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Disassembly is complete.

    Shown below is a view of the back side of the collar.&nbsp; Notice the two rectangular cavities and the reinforcement wall separating them.&nbsp; There are two more on the opposite side of the collar.&nbsp; We will be filling all four of these cavities with epoxy plastic repair putty.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture029-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="600" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture029-1.jpg" width="420" /></a>


    I used a Dremel tool to roughen the inside of the cavities for better adhesion of the plastic repair putty.&nbsp; I also made some very shallow indentations on the interior cavity walls for good measure.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture028.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="600" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture028.jpg" width="420" /></a>



    Knead a small piece of the putty until it is a uniform color and stuff it into one of the cavities.&nbsp; Use a tool with a flat end to firmly pack the epoxy into the cavity.&nbsp; I used the end of an Allen wrench.&nbsp; Repeat for the other three cavities.&nbsp; I would recommend doing one cavity at a time because the epoxy can set up even quicker than the five minutes stated on the package.&nbsp; After all of the cavities have been filled (I forgot to get a pic of this step), the epoxy should be set up enough to shape it to conform with the u-shaped cutouts in the cavity walls (I scraped it with a knife).&nbsp; It is necessary for this u-shaped area to be clear so that the wheel button wires will have adequate clearance when reassembled.&nbsp; The package states that it obtains full cure in one hour.&nbsp; I have found that this is not the case.&nbsp; I would recommend letting it sit for 24 hours.



    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture030-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture030-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Mark the location where you will be drilling.&nbsp; I used a tiny Phillips screwdriver which I heated and pressed into the plastic while turning the screwdriver.&nbsp; This gave a good "center punch" effect.&nbsp; Note that the drilling location should be slightly off-center toward the center of the collar and slightly off-center in the direction of the reinforcement that separates the two cavities.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture031-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture031-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    An easy way to see how deep you are drilling is to use a piece of tape wrapped around the bit.&nbsp; I would have used masking tape if I had had any around the house.&nbsp; I would recommend drilling slightly less than half way through while drilling the pilot hole.&nbsp; I drilled the hole at an angle so that the springs, when installed, would be closer to perpendicular with the paddle shifter, when installed.&nbsp; See below pic showing the springs installed in the collar to see the approximate angle.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture032-1.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture032-1.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    I drilled the holes in several stages so that I could tweak the angle of the hole a bit if desired.&nbsp; Started with approximately 1/16" bit and worked up to 21/64".&nbsp; After the final hole diameter had been reached, I drilled the holes to a depth of about 2/3 the depth of the reinforcing cavity wall using the 21/64" bit.&nbsp; Notice you can see the epoxy putty and the reinforcing wall in the hole.&nbsp; I drilled in this location so that the spring would be resting on both epoxy and plastic, hopefully adding a bit more strength/stability.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture033.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture033.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Cut the springs to length.&nbsp; I think I could have got away with leaving them <strong><em>slightly</em></strong> longer but, I am happy with the amount of resistance obtained with the length I used.&nbsp; The end you cut should be installed into the collar and the other end of the spring should be installed against the paddle shifter.&nbsp; The springs I used were .040 wire gauge, 5/16" outside diameter.


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture034.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture034.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    <a href="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture005.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="420" src="http://i753.photobucket.com/albums/xx178/ttourist_bucket/Picture005.jpg" width="600" /></a>


    Reverse the disassembly procedure to reassemble.&nbsp; As long as you kept your hole angles, hole depths, and spring length consistent, you should have an equal amount of resistance added to the paddle shifters.&nbsp; More realistic and fewer unintentional gear changes.&nbsp; After running it for a night, I noticed other benefits - installing the springs caused the paddles to be pushed away from the wheel while in their "at rest" position.&nbsp; This increased the throw of the paddles and made it so that the paddles had to travel further to affect gear changes.&nbsp; Also, because of the added clearance between the paddles and the wheel, there is now room for my hands to grip the wheel normally, when desired (as opposed to having to keep my fingertips on the paddles at all times - I couldn't really get my fingers in there before).&nbsp; After you have it all put back together, take it out for some test laps and enjoy your G25 that is just a little bit better.&nbsp; <img height="16px" src="http://community.us.playstation.com/4.5.4/images/emoticons/happy.gif" width="16px" />
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page